The Harbinger Online

News Briefs 4/5

Apple vs. the FBI–237

The FBI declared on March 29 that they cracked into the San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook’s iPhone without the help of Apple.

Since Feb. 16, Apple and the FBI have been facing off over the FBI wanting Apple to break the encryption of Farook’s phone. The FBI believes that breaking into this phone will lead them to the gunman’s communications with ISIS.

“I think the FBI did what they needed to do,” junior Hayden Linscott said.“With or without the help of Apple they were going to get into the phone.”

The FBI wanted Apple to alter the System Information File to carry out several functions normal iPhones do not allow. Apple sent a letter to their users that explains that the US government had demanded them to take an unprecedented step that threatens the security of their customers.

“The FBI is in the right to break open a phone that is part of a crime, but they are not in the right to compel Apple to lessen their security to make it easier for them to do that,” social studies teacher Curtis White said. “The FBI’s job is to solve crimes and Apple sees it as their job to protect their customers’ phones.”

According to White, this case has set a precedent on how the government views individual rights and has supported our nation’s long term national security that has been built by the Constitution.

Brussels attacks–220

The Choraliers of the East choir traveled to Germany over spring break and departed on March 20 from Frankfurt to return to the United States. Two days later, terrorist attacks occurred four hours from Frankfurt in Brussels, Belgium. Three bombings took place in the Brussels airport and the Maelbeek metro station, taking the lives of 31 people and injuring many others.

“It’s a scary world we live in, but I feel very fortunate that we were home before any of that happened,” choir director Ken Foley said.“You never know, it could have been someone in the Frankfurt airport, so we are just really lucky.”

The two men convicted are Belgian brothers Ibrahim and Khalid el-Bakraoui. They had a criminal history of being carjackers and bank robbers before the bombings. The two brothers took their lives during the bombings.

If the attacks would have happened while the choir was still in Europe, Ken Foley explained that the choir would have found a place to stay until it was completely safe to travel home, but fortunately, that was not the case.

“I think [the attack] could have taken away from the great experience we had,” junior Allie Libeer said. “If we were there, we would have probably been put in a position that brings a whole new reality to the situation.”

Ceiling Tiles–205

East is currently working on repairing the HVAC system, the heating, ventilation and air conditioning, by removing the old ceilings throughout the building. The ceilings that existed before reconstruction hang above the school’s current ceilings and have glue dots that contain chemical asbestos. However, since the asbestos are contained inside the glue and not in powder form, they are not considered a threat according to Associate Principal Jeff Storey.

“Once the asbestos are removed it will make for a safer school,” physics teacher Andrew Sandoy said.

Because of East’s expansion and remodeling over the years the school has a variety of heating and cooling systems. Many parts of the school are now on different systems, making it difficult to regulate the temperature evenly throughout the school.

The current system in our school has created issues in the past. According to Storey, a pipe exploded last year in the middle of night, shooting hot water into a display case, ruining everything inside. Storey hopes that improvements in the HVAC system will prevent issues in the future.

“This is a good time to unify them all together so they [the classrooms] are on one heating and cooling system,” Storey said.

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